thelifeofapremed:

Tehehe Happy Valentine’s Day to all my fellow Science Nerds out there!

thelifeofapremed:

Tehehe Happy Valentine’s Day to all my fellow Science Nerds out there!

Reblogged from The Life of a Premed

heythereuniverse:

Flemming Christens Mitosis | Zeiss Microscopy 

Approximately 125 years before FUCCI imaging, German anatomist Walther Flemming (not to be confused with Alexander Fleming, the Scottish biologist who discovered Penicillin) was laying down the foundation of modern cell biology by deciphering the major steps of the cell cycle. With new dyes (i.e, aniline) to stain Chromosomen and essentially only the sun to illuminate his microscope, Flemming documented remarkable details of nuclear dynamics during mitosis, describing the process similar to how we think of it today.

Reblogged from
genannetics:

A Beautiful time-lapse of HeLa Cell Division
This simple, gorgeous image of a HeLa cell (the cancer cell line commonly used for cell biology) undergoing mitosis is my favorite photograph from the 2012 Wellcome Image Awards.  Imagine, every cell that make up you and I undergo the same process.  

This composite confocal micrograph uses time-lapse microscopy to show a cancer cell (HeLa) undergoing cell division (mitosis). The DNA is shown in red, and the cell membrane is shown in cyan. The round cell in the centre has a diameter of 20 microns.
By Kuan-Chung Su and Mark Petronczki, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK

genannetics:

A Beautiful time-lapse of HeLa Cell Division

This simple, gorgeous image of a HeLa cell (the cancer cell line commonly used for cell biology) undergoing mitosis is my favorite photograph from the 2012 Wellcome Image Awards.  Imagine, every cell that make up you and I undergo the same process.  

This composite confocal micrograph uses time-lapse microscopy to show a cancer cell (HeLa) undergoing cell division (mitosis). The DNA is shown in red, and the cell membrane is shown in cyan. The round cell in the centre has a diameter of 20 microns.

By Kuan-Chung Su and Mark Petronczki, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK

Reblogged from Gen'Anne'tics

infinity-imagined:

Mitosis, Neurons, and the DNA replication complex.

Reblogged from Infinity Imagined


Half female, half male. Bilateral gynandromorphism is a rare genetic disorder occurring in insects, arachnids, crustaceans, and birds, where a strange combination of genetic material splits a creature perfectly in half, with one side male and one side female.

This is so god damn elegant and powerful. What even.

Half female, half male. 

Bilateral gynandromorphism is a rare genetic disorder occurring in insects, arachnids, crustaceans, and birds, where a strange combination of genetic material splits a creature perfectly in half, with one side male and one side female.

This is so god damn elegant and powerful. What even.

Reblogged from ० ◇Orion◇ ०
Pic I took to some CCD-34Lu cells, (Human fibroblast), coloured with Giemsa.
You can notice some of them in mitosis!

Pic I took to some CCD-34Lu cells, (Human fibroblast), coloured with Giemsa.
You can notice some of them in mitosis!

Pic I took to my subculture of CEM cells (human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells) after 5 days in incubator! 
I coloured them with Trypan blue and put in Bürker chamber… They turned out to be 4*10^6/mL (starting from 0,2*10^6/mL).
Mitosis miracles! (:

Pic I took to my subculture of CEM cells (human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells) after 5 days in incubator!
I coloured them with Trypan blue and put in Bürker chamber… They turned out to be 4*10^6/mL (starting from 0,2*10^6/mL).
Mitosis miracles! (:

Non-sinusoidal bending waves of sperm flagella - C.J. Brokaw

A eukaryotic flagellum is a bundle of nine fused pairs of microtubule doublets surrounding two central single microtubules. The so-called "9+2" structure is characteristic of the core of the eukaryotic flagellum called an axoneme. At the base of a eukaryotic flagellum is a basal body, “blepharoplast” or kinetosome, which is the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) for flagellar microtubules and is about 500 nanometers long. Basal bodies are structurally identical to centrioles. The flagellum is encased within the cell’s plasma membrane, so that the interior of the flagellum is accessible to the cell’s cytoplasm.
Each of the outer 9 doublet microtubules extends a pair of dynein arms (an “inner” and an “outer” arm) to the adjacent microtubule; these dynein arms are responsible for flagellar beating, as the force produced by the arms causes the microtubule doublets to slide against each other and the flagellum as a whole to bend. These dynein arms produce force through ATP hydrolysis. The flagellar axoneme also contains radial spokes, polypeptide complexes extending from each of the outer 9 microtubule doublets towards the central pair, with the “head” of the spoke facing inwards. The radial spoke is thought to be involved in the regulation of flagellar motion, although its exact function and method of action are not yet understood.

Non-sinusoidal bending waves of sperm flagella - C.J. Brokaw

A eukaryotic flagellum is a bundle of nine fused pairs of microtubule doublets surrounding two central single microtubules. The so-called "9+2" structure is characteristic of the core of the eukaryotic flagellum called an axoneme. At the base of a eukaryotic flagellum is a basal body, “blepharoplast” or kinetosome, which is the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) for flagellar microtubules and is about 500 nanometers long. Basal bodies are structurally identical to centrioles. The flagellum is encased within the cell’s plasma membrane, so that the interior of the flagellum is accessible to the cell’s cytoplasm.

Each of the outer 9 doublet microtubules extends a pair of dynein arms (an “inner” and an “outer” arm) to the adjacent microtubule; these dynein arms are responsible for flagellar beating, as the force produced by the arms causes the microtubule doublets to slide against each other and the flagellum as a whole to bend. These dynein arms produce force through ATP hydrolysis. The flagellar axoneme also contains radial spokes, polypeptide complexes extending from each of the outer 9 microtubule doublets towards the central pair, with the “head” of the spoke facing inwards. The radial spoke is thought to be involved in the regulation of flagellar motion, although its exact function and method of action are not yet understood.